Bean, Tomato, and Zucchini Stew with Arugula Pesto

That moment when you google a recipe idea you threw together and find… nothing. I’m going to bask in the glow of this creation and avoid searching too hard (because really, nothing infinitesimally little  is truly original)

The idea for this recipe came to me when I opened my Dominion Harvest box last Tuesday.

Dominion Harvest Delivery

Staring back at me was a bag of Arugula. I decided nearly immediately that I wanted to do something with it other than throw it into a salad. That just seemed too… square.

So sometime between last Wednesday and today, it popped into my head: ARUGULA PESTO.

Arugula Pesto

And the rest is history.

IMG_3132

(Well, actually, the rest involved coming up with what I wanted to put the pesto on and then settling on wanting to put the pesto in because every dinner I make is either a stew or a semi-stew-salad-casserole-conglomerate these days)
IMG_3134

Well that was a long and unnecessary aside.

So here it is. Recipe of the (Tues)day.

Bean, Tomato, and Zucchini Stew with Arugula Pesto

Bean Tomato Zucchini Stew with Arugula Pesto

serves 4-6 

For the Stew

– Extra Virgin Olive Oil
– White Wine
– 1-2 garlic cloves, minced
– 1 onion, chopped
– 3 small zucchinis, chopped
– 1 bell pepper, diced
– salt & pepper
– 1 cup lentils
– 1 15 oz can diced tomatoes (I used fire roasted)
– 2 cups cooked pinto beans (a can is fine, another bean is also fine)
– 1 cup water
– 1 bay leaf

1. Heat a bit of olive oil and a couple splashes of wine over medium-high heat. Add garlic and cook for 30 seconds. Add the vegetables, salt, and pepper and cook until just softened, stirring often.

2. Add the lentils, tomatoes, beans, water, and bay leaf. Stir to combine. Bring to a boil and reduce heat to low. Cover and simmer for 20 minutes.

3. Meanwhile, prepare the pesto using directions below.

4. After the stew is done cooking, add the pesto and stir well to combine. Let cook for another minute to 5 minutes. Remove from heat and serve!

For the Pesto

– big bunch of arugula (I used about 4 cups)
– 1 large clove garlic
– 1/4 cup nuts (I used a combination of walnuts and cashews)
– 1/4 cup parmesan cheese
– Juice of 1/2 large lemon (or whole small)
– Extra virgin olive oil

1. Combine arugula, garlic, nuts, and cheese in your food processor. Process until well-chopped. (I had to add the arugula in batches to fit it all)

2. Add the lemon juice and a nice pour of olive oil. Process again until well-blended.

Bean Tomato and Zucchini Stew with Arugula Pesto

Are you ready for my close up?

How about some mood lighting?

How about some mood lighting?

OK, not to toot my own horn (but toot toot) this was delicious. (If not-so-delicious-looking)

What was the best not-so-delicious-looking thing you’ve made?

Any other arugula ideas?

 

Special Delivery

A few weeks ago, I was at work engaging in my favorite wasting-time-at-work-pastime: online shopping, when it popped into my head: I should join a produce delivery service. I’d thought about joining a CSA in the past, but that was more when I first started trying to eat more produce and wasn’t working full time, living on my own, etc. I thought of them as too expensive for me or a large commitment.

But as I was wasting-time-at-work-online-shopping, I decided to check out what was offered in my area. It turns out, there’s some pretty good choices now. Companies have organized to bring together food from various farms, package them, and deliver them to your door. After perusing the various options, I settled on joining Dominion Harvest.

They boasted several different box options, weekly or biweekly delivery, there’s no commitment (you can cancel whenever you want to), and they report providing only organic or pesticide-free produce. At $39/box for 10-11 produce items, I decided that it was worth it. Let’s go over the benefits:

1) Local produce without having to make sure I can get to a farmer’s market at the appropriate time.

2) No room for indecisive-me to make decisions and waste time

3) Studies show that it is actually more energy-efficient to have groceries delivered to your home than to go to the grocery store {this one’s a stretch since I still have to go for other things, but work with me here}

4) This program forces me to: a) eat in season, b) try new produce, c) be inventive.

**Let me take a moment to declare that I am in no way getting any payment/perks for writing this. This is just me reflecting on an awesome find in Richmond**

 So every other Wednesday, this arrives at my door:

the goods.

the goods.

I gracefully kick the box into my apartment and delve into the goods.

dominion harvest contents and farmsEach delivery comes with a list so you can tell (A) what’s in your box and (B) where each food-stuff came from.

 

Silly me forgot to take pictures of everything before cooking but here’s a look-see at what I got:

Shitakes and Strawberries

Shitakes and Strawberries

Nappa Cabbage, Bibb Lettuce, & Mustard Greens

Nappa Cabbage, Bibb Lettuce, & Mustard Greens

Dino Kale

Dino Kale

The kale, asparagus, beets, beet greens, and broccoli came from Dominion Harvest

So far the deliveries are definitely getting me to eat lots of good greens! (Tis the season) I just added some Bibb lettuce to this lentil dish I threw together the other day. Worked well- who knew.

Have you ever tried a produce delivery service?

What’s your favorite time waster?